Healthy Abbotsford Blog

Sitting is Killing You

4hours

This information is from www.getbritanstanding.org. In recent years a variety of major international research has produced compelling evidence that sitting for more than 4 hours each day leads
to:

•Enzymes responsible for burning harmful blood fats shutting down
•Reduced calorie burning (Metabolic rate)
•Disrupted blood sugar levels
•Increased insulin and blood pressure levels
•Leg muscles switch off

We recommend you calculate the hours you spend sitting on an average “working day”. Make sure you include your sitting time when at work, commuting and at home.

Take frequent breaks from sitting. Stand while you are talking on the phone, have walking meetings, walk to a collegues desk instead of emailing, stand during meetings.

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Top 6 Outdoor Adventure and Camping Blogs

This information is from www.healthyfamiliesbc.ca.

Growing up I was fortunate that our family would go camping several times each summer. It was nothing fancy; we’d set-up camp at provincial parks and entertain ourselves with beach activities, berry picking, and some hiking. Sure, we got dirty and got one too many mosquito bites, but the memories of spending time together as a family and having lots of fun were worth it!

Packing suggestions: If the whole family is going camping, simple low cost items like a Frisbee™, beach or sports ball can get everyone off their lounge chairs and playing games together. A pail and shovel for playing in the sand and making sandcastles can provide hours of fun. For those heading out with a partner or a group of friends, pack your running shoes for jogs or hikes, and a swim suit for the beach (don’t forget the sunscreen!).

To read the rest of the article and see what the top 6 Outdoor Adventure and Camping Blogs are, click here.

Here in Abbotsford, you can also have fun outside with our Live 5210 Playboxes. Click here for more information.

Picture of a Playbox

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How to Choose the Right Oil

This is a great article if you’ve ever found yourself in the kitchen wondering which oil you should be cooking with. In this article from www.acefitness.org, you will learn the cooking uses, the type of fat and smoke point (important so you don’t smoke out your kitchen) for the following oils:

  • Almond
  • Avacado
  • Butter
  • Canola
  • Coconut
  • Grapeseed
  • Olive
  • Peanut
  • Sesame
  • Sunflower
  • Vegetable

 

The Article

You’ve probably heard that extra virgin olive oil is good for you (hello, Mediterranean diet) and that margarine is bad for you (trans fats). But what kinds of oils are best for your health? And which ones are best suited for high-temperature cooking like sautéing, stir-frying and baking versus better for salad dressing and finishing sauces? Most people are familiar with basic cooking oils, such as canola and vegetable oils, and the most popular kid on the block (with a mixed reputation), coconut oil. If you’re feeling a bit confused, we’ll help you sort things out. Click here to read the rest.

 

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The Most Powerful Drug – August 28 Event

On August 28  one of the world’s leading experts on physical activity and health. Dr. Steven Blair will be doing a public presentation at Matsqui Centennial Auditorium (MCA) from 7-8:30pm. The presentation will include the latest research around what the real impact of physical activity is on our health and he will end the session with time for the public to ask questions.

Not sure who Steven Blair is? Here are a few links that you can visit to get a better sense of what he is all about:

Video (9 minutes) - 23.5 hours

This YouTube sensation (more than 3.5 million views)  which includes Dr. Blairs research

 

Article – Fit vs. Fat, are they mutually exclusive? A case study.

Audio (4 minutes) – Is sitting the new smoking?

This session will also highlight how Healthy Abbotsford is helping promote physical activity and will launch Abbotsford’s  “Exercise is Medicine” initiative.

There will also be an information booth set-up from 5:30-9pm outside of MCA where you can learn more about what is available here in Abbotsford.

EIM - Public Presentation

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5 Common Nutrition Myths

This information comes from the Canadian Diabetes Association.

1. MYTH: Avoid carbs if you want to lose weight

2. MYTH: Sea salt is natural, so it’s better for you than table salt

3. MYTH: Cooking meals at home takes way too much time

4. MYTH: Healthy food costs too much

5. MYTH: If you eat too much sugar, you’ll get diabetes

To read more about each myth click here to read the entire article.

healthy food and a free weight

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ONE Step to Better Grades and Better Self Esteem

Here is a great video from the CBC program “Live Right Now”. The video was all about the physical and emotional benefits of eating together as a family. The physical benefits I had heard before, but this was the first time I had heard about the scientifically proven emotional benefits.

Children who come from families who eat together:

  1. More likely to get better grades
  2. More likely to have better language skills
  3. More likely to make healthy food choices
  4. Less likely to be overweight
  5. Better self esteem
  6. Less likely to experience depression
  7. Less likely to develop eating disorders
  8. Less likely to use drugs or alcohol

The dietitian in the video emphasizes that the most important thing that you need to do for family meals to happen is to plan ahead and be organized. Click here for information that will help you create a weekly meal plan for your family.

 

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15 Salads Worse Than A Big Mac

Many people assume that if it’s a salad,  it’s healthy. Believe it or not, this article has a a list of 15 salads that actually have more calories than a BIG MAC!

 

Oriental_Chicken_Salad_6_2011

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Don’t Make These Mistakes When Running Outdoors

This is a great article from Shape magazine. Click here to access the original article.

 

Five mistakes you don’t want to make when hitting the trails

Warmer Spring weather inspires many to ditch the gym and run outside in the fresh air and on open roads. Before you make the switch from treadmill to street, avoid these common mistakes that could lead to injury.

Doing Too Much Too Soon

Between the steep hills, wind factor, uneven or slippery terrain, and not having a belt propelling you forward, running outside is harder than running on a treadmill. And since it’s more taxing on your muscles, you are more prone to shin splints and other pains. Start off with shorter distances on flat roads or trails, and as your endurance improves, gradually increase your mileage and hill work. If you experience shin pain, take a few minutes to walk and stretch out your lower legs. Don’t run through the pain because it may cause further injury, preventing you from running at all. When you’re not running, strengthen your shins with this exercise.

Trying to Maintain a Constant Pace

The treadmill belt keeps a consistent pace for you, so it’s easy to get into a rhythm. Outside is a whole new ballgame since you’re in charge of maintaining your speed. Aside from using your own muscles to propel each step, the steeper inclines, road obstacles, and uneven terrain make it harder to run fast. Don’t feel compelled to push yourself to run at the same pace you did on the treadmill you may end up falling or pulling a muscle. Run at a moderate and comfortable pace that allows you to run safely, and gradually increase your speed over several weeks. Check out these tips on how to become a faster runner.

Running on Pavement

Although easily accessible, pavement is a hard, unforgiving surface. Abruptly switching from a soft treadmill belt to a stiff road can be such a shock to the muscles and joints; some may find it hard to run half a mile without stopping in pain. Ease into running on the pavement by starting on the grassy areas between the sidewalk and the road, or better yet, stick to dirt roads or woodsy trails. Here are even more trail-running tips for the beginner.

Wearing the Wrong Shoes

A regular running sneaker was perfect for the flat, predictable surface of a treadmill, but once you head outdoors, make sure your sneaker’s tread can handle the gravel, dirt roads, and slick trails. You want a sneaker that supports your feet and offers a grippy sole so you feel confident moving over uneven surfaces.

Getting Lost

It’s easy to hit the ground running, but if you’re not paying attention, you may end up in an unfamiliar neighborhood or woodsy trail, with no clue as to how to get home. The adrenaline that builds from a panicked feeling of being lost can often make you run faster without paying attention to where your feet step, increasing the likelihood of tripping. Prevent getting lost by planning new routes before you head out the door. Always bring your phone along and try one of the many iPhone running apps that use a GPS to keep track of your location (I use the Nike+ GPS app). Taking a running buddy is also a smart idea, and get in the habit of telling someone where you’re going before you head out, just in case you get hurt or lost.

 

 

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5 Ways You Can Make Health Last

You may not know it, but you’re at risk of spending the last 10 years of your life battling illness and disability.

Two older adults kayaking  

Good health habits lead to a vitality-filled future.

Research shows that for many of us, there’s 10-year gap between how long we’ll live and how long we will be in good health. But we can close that gap and change our future. We can start now to ensure that last decade is spent doing the things we love to do – travelling, spending time with family, pursuing hobbies.

The Heart and Stroke Foundation has launched Make Health Last – a movement to motivate Canadians to make healthy changes now so that they can enjoy their later years with vitality.

The key is the risk factors that increase our odds of heart disease, stroke and other illnesses. Almost all of us have at least one risk factor. Some, such as our genetic heritage, can’t be changed. But other risk factors can be controlled through the choices we make every day.

Need convincing? Click here to take a look at how many healthy years these risk factors could cost you.

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What Will Your Last 10 Years Look Like?

Here is a video from The Heart & Stroke Foundation. While it doesn’t go through how to actually live healthier, the message is a powerful one. While there are many things in our health that we cannot control, there are many that we can. And those that we can control, make a big difference in the quality of our lives.

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